Prior to joining our CrossFit classes, everyone must participate in Foundations, a 3 week-long program designed to gradually introduce the movements, training and intensity found in our group classes.

Click here for more info.

What is CrossFit?

CrossFit is essentially cardio, gymnastics and strength training rolled into one eclectic, efficient package. We perform pullups, pushups, handstands and box jumps.  We lift weights, swing kettlebells, climb ropes and throw medicine balls.  We run, row, jump rope and use gymnastics rings. We mix all of these elements together in challenging and creative ways so that you never get bored.     

Our coaches are responsible for ensuring that your workout is not easy nor impossible, that your form and range of motion are correct, that your speed and intensity are appropriate, that the exercises and weights are adjusted to your fitness level, and that you have a plan for long-term success.

By committing to our program, you will learn new skills, improve your nutrition habits, get stronger, feel and look better and improve your quality of life.

« Spring Cleaning = No Legumes, No Soy | Main | Spring Cleaning = No Grains! »
Tuesday
Apr052011

Spring Cleaning = No Dairy!

Yes, that includes the milk in your coffee."Dairy intake, you see, stimulates insulin secretion. Lots and lots of it – more than can be explained by the lactose (a sugar) content. In fact, the lactose content of dairy doesn’t even have a big insulin effect when compared to other carbs. This is surprising to some, since the general understanding is that insulin is released primarily in response to carbohydrate intake. What gives? Well, in evolutionary terms, think about a growing beast needing to maximize the utility of every drop of the precious liquid. With dairy, it’s the protein plus the carbs that are responsible for the large insulin release.

Take milk, the most egregious “offender.” Both whole milk and skim milk elicit significant insulin responses that you wouldn’t predict from looking at their protein and carb contents, and the fat in whole milk doesn’t blunt it (maybe non-homogenized whole milk would be a different story… I don’t know). Cream and butter are not particularly insulinogenic, while milk of all kinds, yogurt, cottage cheese, and anything with casein or whey, including powders and cottage cheese, elicits a significant insulin response. In one study, milk was even more insulinogenic than white bread, but less so than whey protein with added lactose and cheese with added lactose. Another study found that full-fat fermented milk products and regular full-fat milk were about as insulinogenic as white bread.

And yet we need insulin to shuttle all sorts of nutrients into cells, like protein and glycogen into muscles. It’s there for a reason, so to demonize it is misguided. It’s chronically elevated insulin and insulin resistance – you know, the hallmarks of metabolic syndrome – that are the problem."

 - Excerpt from "Dairy and Its Effect on Insulin Secretion (and What It Means for Your Waistline)" by Mark Sisson, Marks Daily Apple.  Link to full article HERE

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Spring Cleaning Nutrition Challenge - Kick Off Seminar This Saturday!

We will be kicking off our "Spring Cleaning" Nutrition Challenge this Saturday, April 9th with a Nutrition Seminar from 11:00am-1:00pm.  The seminar will include a lecture, Q&A, and a detailed explanation of the Spring Cleaning Challenge. 

For all of the juicy details about the Challenge, click here.

There is a Sign Up Sheet available at the Front Desk.  We encourage all of you to participate and experience how 30 (or so) days of clean eating and living can change your life!

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Reader Comments (1)

What's lactaid then? I'm fine with cutting that out, I'd rather have almond or coconut milk in my tea anyway, but where does Lactaid factor to into that kind of thing?

April 6, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterAndrea

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